How to Succeed at MU: Tips from Your Academic Advisor


  1. Go to class.
  2. Keep academic deadlines in mind (e.g., last day to drop without a grade -- after this date, you will receive a grade in the course when withdrawing from it -- an "F" if you are failing at the time of withdrawal or a "W" if you are passing.) This includes students having academic difficulties in courses and students who have personal/family issues preventing them from attending.
  3. Do not wait until it is too late to ask for help with a tough class—contact your advisor! We will assist you in finding the help you need in order to succeed academically at MU.
  4. Explore your career interests at the Career Center. Utilize the career/graduate school resources available in the Advising Office. Talk to your advisor about your personal and professional goals. Your advisor can recommend faculty members that can provide you with more information about your field of interest.
  5. Don't Cheat. Academic integrity is expected of all students at MU. Instructors are required to report suspected incidents of cheating to the Office of the Provost. All incidents are investigated, and consequences can range from receiving a failing grade in the course to expulsion from the university.
  6. Check your student e-mail account on a regular basis (at least once a week). You are responsible for checking your email account; if you choose not to do this, you WILL miss out on important information (e.g., how to get into closed psych courses, when to file an application for graduation, when you can obtain a permission number to enroll in your capstone.)
  7. Make sure that MU has your current address and phone number (you can change on myZou).
  8. Plan Ahead. Be aware of course sequences (e.g., foreign language, research methods courses).
  9. Get involved on campus—consider joining Psi Chi/Psych Club (psychology student organization).
  10. Gain experience in your field of interest through volunteer work, employment, helping with research, etc. This will give you an advantage in your future job and/or graduate school search.