Ashley Groh

Ashley Groh
Assistant Professor
204B McAlester Hall
Lab Area: 
Research Interests: 

***I will be considering graduate student applications for the upcoming academic year. Interested candidates may email me to discuss their research interests and graduate school goals.***

Dr. Groh's research focuses on the significance of children’s early relationships with primary caregivers for social and emotional development across the lifespan. The goals of her research lie in understanding the contribution of early parent-child relationships to developmental adaptation in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood; the developmental processes through which such experiences exert an organizing force on development; and the mechanisms by which adversity within early parent-child relationships can be overcome.

Dr. Groh's research interests lie at the intersection of social, emotional, and biological processes in development. As such, her research is multi-method in nature, including interview and self-report measures of representations of early experiences, observational assessments of family processes, and biological measures of autonomic physiological activity (e.g., electrodermal reactivity, heart rate) and brain activity (e.g., EEG/ERP). In addition, Dr. Groh uses a multi-faceted approach to addressing developmental research questions, leveraging meta-analytic, longitudinal, and experimental methods.

Selected Publications: 

Journal Articles:

1. Groh, A. M., & Roisman, G. I. (2009). Adults’ autonomic and subjective emotional responses to infant vocalizations: The role of secure base script knowledge. Developmental Psychology, 45, 889-893.

2. Fortuna, K., Roisman, G. I., Haydon, K. C., Groh, A. M., & Holland, A. S. (2011). Attachment states of mind and the quality of young adults’ sibling relationships. Developmental Psychology, 47, 1366-1373.

3. Groh, A. M., Roisman, G. I., van IJzendoorn, M. H., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M. J., & Fearon, R. P. (2012). The significance of insecure and disorganized attachment for children’s internalizing symptoms: A meta-analytic study. Child Development, 83, 591-610.

4. Roisman, G. I., Newman, D. A., Fraley, R. C., Haltigan, J. D., Groh, A. M., & Haydon, K. C. (2012). Distinguishing differential susceptibility from diathesis-stress: Recommendations for evaluating interaction effects. Development and Psychopathology, 24, 389-409.

5. Roisman, G. I., Booth-LaForce, C., Belsky, J., Burt, K. B., & Groh, A. M. (2013). Molecular-genetic correlates of infant attachment: A cautionary tale. Attachment & Human Development, 15, 384-406.

6. Groh, A. M., Fearon, R. P., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M. J., Van IJzendoorn, M. H., Steele, R. D., & Roisman, G. I. (2014). The significance of attachment security for children’s social competence with peers: A meta-analytic study. Attachment & Human Development, 16, 103-136.

7. Emery, H. T., McElwain, N. L., Groh, A. M., Haydon, K. C., Roisman, G. I. (2014). Dispositional empathy and electrodermal reactivity: Interactive contributions to maternal sensitivity with toddler-aged children. Journal of Family Psychology, 28, 505-515.

8. Groh, A. M., Roisman, G. I., Booth-LaForce, C., Fraley, R. C., Owen, M. T., Cox, M. J., & Burchinal, M. R. (2014). Stability of attachment security from infancy to late adolescence. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 79, 51-66.

9. Booth-LaForce, C., Groh, A. M., Burchinal, M. R., Roisman, G. I., Owen, M. T., & Cox, M. (2014). Caregiving and contextual sources of continuity and change in attachment security from infancy to late adolescence. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 79, 67-84.

10. Groh, A. M., Roisman, G. I., Haydon, K. C., Bost, K., McElwain, N., Garcia, L., & Hester, C., (2014). Mothers’ electrophysiological, subjective, and observed emotional responses to infant crying: The role of secure base script knowledge, Development & Psychopathology.

Book Chapters:

1. Roisman, G.I. & Groh, A.M. (2011). Attachment theory and research in developmental psychology: An overview and appreciative critique. In M.K. Underwood & L.H. Rosen (Eds.), Social Development: Relationships in Infancy, Childhood, and Adolescence. (pp. 101-126).

2. Fearon, R. P., Groh, A. M., Van IJzendoorn, M. H., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M. J., Roisman, G. I. (in press). Attachment and developmental psychopathology. In D. Cicchetti & D. Cohen (Eds.), Developmental Psychopathology (3rd Edition).