Amanda Rose
Professor
212E McAlester
RoseA@missouri.edu
Tenured/Tenure Track
Lab Information
403 Noyes Hall
About the Lab

The Peer Relations Lab

The research conducted by the peer relations lab is aimed at learning about the friendships and other peer relationships of children and adolescence. There is a particular focus on gender differences in these relationships and on how these relationships impact psychological adjustment.

Research Interests

Research Interests
• the development of friendships and other peer relationships during childhood and adolescence
• gender differences in friendships and other peer relationships during childhood and adolescence
• the impact of peer relationship processes on psychological adjustment in childhood and adolescence
• women’s professional development; challenges and solutions for women in the workplace

Bio

View Dr. Rose's personal website.

Follow Dr. Rose on facebook and twitter:

https://www.facebook.com/amandaj.rose.39

@amandajanelrose

Selected Publications

Rose, A. J., & Asher, S. R. (2017). The social tasks of friendship: Do girls and boys excel in different tasks? Child Development Perspectives, 11, 3-8.

Rose, A. J., Smith, R. L, Glick, G. C., & Schwartz-Mette, R. A (2016). Girls’ and boys’ problem talk: Implications for emotional closeness in friendship. Developmental Psychology 52, 629-239.

Furman, W., & Rose, A. J. (2015). Friendships, romantic relationships, and other dyadic peer relationships. In R. Lerner (Series Ed.) and M. E. Lamb & C. G. Coll (Volume Eds.), The handbook of child psychology and developmental science (Seventh edition): Vol 3, Social and emotional development (pp. 932-974). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons Inc.

Rose, A. J., Schwartz-Mette, R. A., Glick, G. C., Smith, R. L., & Luebbe, A. M. (2014).  An observational study of co-rumination in adolescent friendships. Developmental Psychology, 50, 2199-2209.

Rose, A. J., Schwartz-Mette, R. A., Smith, R. L., Asher, S. R., Swenson, L. P., Carlson, W., & Waller, E. M. (2012). How girls and boys expect that disclosure about problems will make them feel: Implications for friendships. Child Development, 83, 844-863.

Lab Area